Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 1

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Medicine, Nursing

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” — Benjamin Franklin Closing the health workforce gap, so that local leaders and local professionals can meet local need, is not a short-term commitment. But improvements in the long-term necessitate reflection and data-based adjustments in strategy and implementation. Any effort to create lasting change must not only celebrate “progress” framed broadly, but also effectively measure improvement, evaluate impact, and learn – from both success and failure – so as to continuously improve upon its approach. And we take our commitment to continuous learning and improvement within our work seriously. Since 2013, Seed Global Health has partnered with the US Peace Corps and the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to deploy volunteer nurses and physicians to teach and train medical and nursing students as part of a unique collaboration – the … Read More

Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Health Workforce

Mark Marino, MPH, Seed Global HealthBlog, Featured, Liberia, Medicine, Nursing, Tanzania

Tomorrow marks the start of this year’s Skoll World Forum, an event focused on social entrepreneurship, innovation, and solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. As in previous years, there promises to be robust conversation on increasing access to quality health services by leveraging the power of technology. With the supply of health workers in developing countries not meeting the demand, it is important to identify innovative technology that can help doctors, nurses, midwives, and community health workers provide effective and efficient patient care. With nearly two-thirds of the world’s population in possession of a cell phone, mobile health (mHealth) in particular has enormous potential to support health workers. Consider for a moment one way that mobile is being used to empower nurses. Research shows that often nurses feel unsupported in the workplace, and have to contend with outdated information, … Read More

Leading for a TB-Free World

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured, Nursing, Swaziland

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a devastating disease that disproportionately affects developing countries: today, over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. World TB Day is commemorated each year on March 24th to raise awareness around the devastating consequences of tuberculosis (TB). Access to health is a fundamental human right – skilled health professionals are the leaders who can help prevent, treat, and end TB around the world. Nurses, midwives, doctors and health providers on the ground, in developing countries have a clear view of how TB affects their communities. The Kingdom of Swaziland has the world’s highest incidence rate of TB, with 80% of TB cases co-infected with HIV. We interviewed Volunteer Educator Yohannes Wondimagegnehu, RN, BSN, MPH who teaches community health nursing at the University of Swaziland as a guest lecturer through the Global Health Service Partnership … Read More

Partnering for Quality Education & Quality Care

Zack LangwayBlog, Medicine, Nursing

Every country should have a strong health workforce so that all people can access the care they need to live healthy and productive lives. And at the backbone of a strong health workforce are doctors, nurses and midwives who are trained, confident, and ready ensure that everyone, no matter where they live, has equal access to high quality care. Seed Global Health believes that excellence in education is the cornerstone of health professionals’ success. And we strive to support this vision, partnering with U.S. academic institutions allow us to deepen the quality and sustainability of the training and teaching we support in five African countries. “By pairing healthcare volunteers from universities and medical and nursing schools across the United States with local health professionals in countries like Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda, we create a ripple effect of shared knowledge,” explains … Read More

Nursing Now!

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Midwifery, Nursing, Uganda

As the majority of front line health workforce, nurses around the world are essential to meeting the health care needs of our communities. Yet the dire shortage of nurses globally poses a major challenge for high and low income countries alike:  sub-Saharan Africa alone faces a shortfall of more than 600,000 nurses. Yesterday, the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses launched the Nursing Now campaign, which aims to raise the status of nursing and empower nurses around the world. The three-year campaign will work with partners around the world to advocate for nurses, supporting their ability to be properly trained, increasing their role in policy making, and enabling them to tackle today’s and tomorrow’s health challenges. Uganda, where Seed Global Health has been supporting nursing education since 2013, was chosen to pilot the Nursing Now Africa initiative. … Read More

Championing Health Workers in the SDGs

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Liberia, Malawi, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda

The most recent report from the United Nations on the advancements made towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals finds that while progress has been made across all areas of development, the pace of progress has been slow, and advancements have been uneven to fully meet the implementation of the SDGs by 2030. Established in 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted by all member countries of the United Nations focused on ending poverty, protecting the planet, and ensuring prosperity for all as part of a new sustainable development agenda. Each goal has specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years. SDG 3 seeks to ensure health and well-being for all, at every stage of life. Major strides have been made in improving health around the world: between 2000 and 2015, the global maternal mortality ratio declined by 37 per … Read More

Caught in the Crossfire: Health Systems in Conflict Areas

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing

 The conflicts in Syria, Yemen, and Afghanistan are unlike any wars seen before. Long-running and complex, these conflicts have devastated these countries – untold numbers of citizens have been killed and even more have been forced to flee their homes for neighboring states. There are more than five million registered Syrian refugees alone. As violence and fighting wages on, infrastructure and public services have collapsed. Health systems in these countries have been torn apart. Overwhelmed, understaffed, structurally damaged, and under-resourced, health centers have been brought to the brink of collapse. As of October 2017, resulting from the ongoing conflict, health facilities in Yemen had not received funding to cover operational costs in thirteen months and almost 30,000 health workers had not received their salaries consistently during this period. Yet they ask to save lives in dire conditions every day. CSIS … Read More

Nurse Anesthetists Leading Change in Liberia

Daisy WinnerBlog, Liberia, Nursing

Ravaged by civil war and the Ebola crisis, the Liberian health system has struggled to meet local health needs. Life expectancy is only 61 years. 67 of every 1,000 children do not survive till their fifth birthday. And the country’s high maternal mortality rate remains among the world’s worst. But two men are fighting to change that. Dr. W. Fassah and Mr. Aaron Sonah, from Phebe School of Nursing, are two nurse anesthetists who are transforming care for patients by training the next generation of Liberian nurses. The only training school for nursing anesthesia in Liberia, Phebe has trained the majority of Liberia’s nursing anesthetists since 1970. And this month, Dr. Fassah and Mr. Sonah have been visiting Boston for an intensive training program. In partnership with Northeastern University’s (NEU) School of Nursing, and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), … Read More

Strengthening Nursing in Malawi

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Nursing, Uncategorized

Globally, nurses deliver the highest percentage of patient care. They are critical to strengthening health systems and responding to more acute crisis, like disease outbreaks. Despite being on the frontline of care, the global shortage of nurses continues to grow. Currently, it is estimated that 9 million more nurses and midwives are necessary to adequately meet health care needs. In Malawi, there is fewer than 1 nurse to care for every 1,000 people.  And such a significant shortage may be a contributing factor to poor health outcomes. To overcome this shortage, Seed Global Health has been placing volunteer nursing educators in Malawi since 2013. Since our inaugural year, 32 nurse educators have taught and trained future nurses and nursing educators at four nursing institutions. Working alongside local nursing professionals and educators, our volunteers strengthen in-country education. They teach courses, develop … Read More

Thankful More than Ever for Health Workers

Seed Global HealthBlog, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing

It’s the time of year when many of us join family and friends to reflect on all that we have to be thankful for. While we may focus on the achievements and successes in our own lives, we should also reflect on how far together, our world, has progressed. The global poverty rate has been halved since 2000, with some research suggesting that someone escapes extreme poverty every 1.2 seconds. Around the world, under-five mortality rate has decreased by 56 percent and about 20 000 fewer children died every day in 2016 than in 1990. Global average life expectancy increased by 5 years between 2000 and 2015, the fastest increase since the 1960s. As we reflect with gratitude on these achievements, now more than ever, we wholeheartedly thank the millions of health workers around the world who are making this progress a reality. They … Read More