A Community Unites: Run for Refugees 2018

Angie Boehmer RN, MPHBlog, Featured, Nursing, Uganda

Angie Boehmer is a Pediatric Nurse and Volunteer Nurse Educator at Muni University in Arua, Uganda through the Global Health Service Partnership.   According to UNHCR, Uganda is home to over 1.4 million refugees, with an influx of 376,000 arriving just in the past year. Many are fleeing war in South Sudan. West Nile, Uganda, the region where I live, is just across the border from South Sudan and hosts a large portion of these refugees. A few weeks ago, my town held a Run for Refugees run to raise funds to improve access to clean drinking water in refugee settlements. The tagline for the event was: “Fostering solidarity, social co-existence, and inclusiveness among refugees and host communities.” The morning included speeches, the run, and a dance party at the finish line. The run routed through town and even people … Read More

Commitment to Care: Training Critical Care Nurses in Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Tanzania, Uncategorized

“We all belong to a large international community of critical care nurses” Tanzanian Critical Care Nurse In Tanzania, a country of more than 50 million people, there is a dual burden of high prevalence of infectious disease, such as HIV, and a growing prevalence of non-communicable disease. Additionally, there is a significant, and increasing, burden of critical illness. Strengthening critical care services, in both urban and rural areas, is a priority of the Ministry of Health. Nurses in Tanzania provide the majority of care in critical care units and require specialized skills to work within such a clinically complex environment. Progress in pre-service, masters and in-service training in critical care nursing has been made, but there remains a need to strengthen the clinical aspects of training, particularly in-service training, to care for such high acuity patient. Partnering with Massachusetts General … Read More

Midwives: “A Force for the Better”

Diana Garde, CNM, ARNP​Blog, Midwifery, Nursing, Uganda

People ask “why midwifery?” and “what drew you to this field?” and I often feel that my attempt to answer falls very short of explaining how it is that I ended up in Northern Uganda, teaching midwifery to eager, bright baccalaureate-level students. How does one adequately explain why we crave some thing, feel at peace in some special place or why we fall in love? How do you express the gut feeling that something is ‘right’? How do you explain the draw towards something that at once needs to be absorbed and simultaneously diffused outward in the world? My choice in career has been not so much a calculated decision, but rather an organic movement. Each day around the world, there are 360,000 heroic women who experience childbirth. Approximately 830 of those women die in the process. Not all are … Read More

Midwives: Drivers and Leaders in Addressing MNCH Gaps

Robyn Churchill, Senior Midwifery Advisor, Seed Global HealthBlog, Midwifery, Nursing

Midwives have existed even before formalized healthcare. We were the original healers, birth attendants, and confidantes. The role of the midwife has been improved upon and integrated into the healthcare sector, but historically, midwives have come from their communities, and in nearly every society on the planet, women go to midwives to birth their babies. I was teaching in Newark, NJ and on my way to graduate studies in education when I had a transformational experience with midwives. Just having had a baby with midwives in a birth center, I was supporting two of my students, providing advice to them as they navigated their ways through sub-par healthcare during their own pregnancies. I thought back to the quality and compassionate care I received from my midwives, and said to myself, “in another life, I would be a midwife.”’ It’s a … Read More

Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Health Workforce

Mark Marino, MPH, Seed Global HealthBlog, Featured, Liberia, Medicine, Nursing, Tanzania

Tomorrow marks the start of this year’s Skoll World Forum, an event focused on social entrepreneurship, innovation, and solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. As in previous years, there promises to be robust conversation on increasing access to quality health services by leveraging the power of technology. With the supply of health workers in developing countries not meeting the demand, it is important to identify innovative technology that can help doctors, nurses, midwives, and community health workers provide effective and efficient patient care. With nearly two-thirds of the world’s population in possession of a cell phone, mobile health (mHealth) in particular has enormous potential to support health workers. Consider one way that mobile is being used to empower nurses. Research shows that often nurses feel unsupported in the workplace, and have to contend with outdated information, protocols, and limited … Read More

Leading for a TB-Free World

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured, Nursing, Swaziland

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a devastating disease that disproportionately affects developing countries: today, over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. World TB Day is commemorated each year on March 24th to raise awareness around the devastating consequences of tuberculosis (TB). Access to health is a fundamental human right – skilled health professionals are the leaders who can help prevent, treat, and end TB around the world. Nurses, midwives, doctors and health providers on the ground, in developing countries have a clear view of how TB affects their communities. The Kingdom of Swaziland has the world’s highest incidence rate of TB, with 80% of TB cases co-infected with HIV. We interviewed Volunteer Educator Yohannes Wondimagegnehu, RN, BSN, MPH who teaches community health nursing at the University of Swaziland as a guest lecturer through the Global Health Service Partnership … Read More

Partnering for Quality Education & Quality Care

Zack LangwayBlog, Medicine, Nursing

Every country should have a strong health workforce so that all people can access the care they need to live healthy and productive lives. And at the backbone of a strong health workforce are doctors, nurses and midwives who are trained, confident, and ready ensure that everyone, no matter where they live, has equal access to high quality care. Seed Global Health believes that excellence in education is the cornerstone of health professionals’ success. And we strive to support this vision, partnering with U.S. academic institutions allow us to deepen the quality and sustainability of the training and teaching we support in five African countries. “By pairing healthcare volunteers from universities and medical and nursing schools across the United States with local health professionals in countries like Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda, we create a ripple effect of shared knowledge,” explains … Read More

Nursing Now!

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Midwifery, Nursing, Uganda

As the majority of front line health workforce, nurses around the world are essential to meeting the health care needs of our communities. Yet the dire shortage of nurses globally poses a major challenge for high and low income countries alike:  sub-Saharan Africa alone faces a shortfall of more than 600,000 nurses. Yesterday, the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses launched the Nursing Now campaign, which aims to raise the status of nursing and empower nurses around the world. The three-year campaign will work with partners around the world to advocate for nurses, supporting their ability to be properly trained, increasing their role in policy making, and enabling them to tackle today’s and tomorrow’s health challenges. Uganda, where Seed Global Health has been supporting nursing education since 2013, was chosen to pilot the Nursing Now Africa initiative. … Read More

Championing Health Workers in the SDGs

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Liberia, Malawi, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda

The most recent report from the United Nations on the advancements made towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals finds that while progress has been made across all areas of development, the pace of progress has been slow, and advancements have been uneven to fully meet the implementation of the SDGs by 2030. Established in 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted by all member countries of the United Nations focused on ending poverty, protecting the planet, and ensuring prosperity for all as part of a new sustainable development agenda. Each goal has specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years. SDG 3 seeks to ensure health and well-being for all, at every stage of life. Major strides have been made in improving health around the world: between 2000 and 2015, the global maternal mortality ratio declined by 37 per … Read More

Caught in the Crossfire: Health Systems in Conflict Areas

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing

 The conflicts in Syria, Yemen, and Afghanistan are unlike any wars seen before. Long-running and complex, these conflicts have devastated these countries – untold numbers of citizens have been killed and even more have been forced to flee their homes for neighboring states. There are more than five million registered Syrian refugees alone. As violence and fighting wages on, infrastructure and public services have collapsed. Health systems in these countries have been torn apart. Overwhelmed, understaffed, structurally damaged, and under-resourced, health centers have been brought to the brink of collapse. As of October 2017, resulting from the ongoing conflict, health facilities in Yemen had not received funding to cover operational costs in thirteen months and almost 30,000 health workers had not received their salaries consistently during this period. Yet they ask to save lives in dire conditions every day. CSIS … Read More