Respectful Maternity Care in Midwifery

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Midwifery

A mother has an unplanned Caesarian and her tubes are tied without her consent. A woman is scolded when her child dies of malaria when she admits he was not sleeping under a mosquito net. A baby is delivered by the maid at the health center because the midwife has not responded to the late night call. All of these are examples of disrespectful care that women should not need to tolerate. Yet too many women have too few choices: they have no money for private care, few resources, poor education, and a growing fear of health care that only get worse when they receive such inadequate and disrespectful care. There is no more vulnerable time in a woman’s life than when she is laboring, anticipating the birth of her child. The global lifetime maternal mortality risk is 1 in … Read More

Safe Surgery: Essential for Wellbeing

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Medicine, Uncategorized

Surgically-treatable conditions kill close to 17 million people each year, and worldwide, five billion people do not currently have access to safe surgical care and anesthesia. In low- and middle-income countries, 9 out of 10 people cannot access even the most basic surgical services. Dr. Bela Denes, a general surgeon who has been teaching in Malawi for the last year, is dedicated to closing the gap in safe surgery and saving lives. As a Seed Global Health Volunteer, Bela has been teaching young medical students at the University of Malawi, College of Medicine, equipping them with the essential skills to perform lifesaving surgeries, even with limited resources. We asked Bela to reflect on his time as a surgeon and educator in Malawi and share his thoughts on improving access to safe surgery. What are the biggest challenges facing safe surgery … Read More

Humanizing Care: How Nurses Put People First

Zack LangwayBlog, Malawi, Nursing

As part of our National Nurses’ Week series on nursing and the Sustainable Development Goals, Malawian nurse educator and Coordinator for Academic Affairs for SJOGCHS, our colleague and friend Isaac Ziba, reflected on “humanized health care” and the role of nurses in centering the human experience for a patient’s best care, with a foreword by Seed Global Health’s Julie Anathan. Foreword: The ability to provide humanized and patient centered care can be challenging within environments where human resources for health are limited. In the US we have over 9 nurses per 1000 people while in Malawi there are less than one per 1000 people. In areas of the world where there are dire shortages of nurses, the day to day responsibilities for nursing staff can be stressful and overwhelming. In these settings, how do nurses stay focused on providing holistic care?  St. … Read More

Photo Gallery: Championing Midwives in Malawi

Zack LangwayBlog, Malawi, Midwifery, Nursing

In the days ahead of International Day of the Midwife, Seed Global Health joined The Association of Malawian Midwives and several other partners to convene, empower, and champion Malawi’s midwives. More than 75 participants from across Malawi, including training institutions and students, were present for this conference. The photos below were taken by our Malawi Country Representative, Dr. Bridget Malewezi, during the gathering.

Celebrating Midwives: A Tale of Two Lindas

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Malawi, Nursing, Tanzania

As we celebrate International Day of the Midwife, we reflect on the critical contributions of our Volunteer midwives to helping build the next generation of midwifery. Since 2013, Seed has placed fifteen midwives who have trained close to 2,000 individuals. These midwife educators are providing essential training to the next generation, who will in turn provide care for countless numbers of mothers and their babies. Linda Jacobsen, Seed Global Health Deputy Chief Nursing Officer and Director of Midwifery Programs, has worked in reproductive health and public health for more than thirty years. She was part of the inaugural class of Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers and taught at Bugando Medical Center in Mwanza in 2013. Linda Robinson is currently serving a Nurse Educator in Malawi and has been practicing as a nurse-midwife for thirty years, working from rural Maine to … Read More

Jasintha: Nurses Make all the Difference for Mom and Baby

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Malawi, Nursing

Jasintha Mtengezo knows what it means to be a leader in nursing and education in Malawi. Jasintha grew up in Mzimba, a northern region of Malawi. When she was just a young girl, her father became sick and quickly passed away. But through the incredibly difficulty of that time, she noticed around her the kindness and compassion that the nurses extended to her father. These incredible nurses inspired her to pursue her own career in nursing. Jasintha is currently the Dean of Faculty at Daeyang University School of Nursing in Malawi and enrolled as a PhD student at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. After receiving her Bachelor’s in nursing and eventually a Master of Public Health degree, she gained experience working as a nurse at the bedside and then administrator on her way towards her current leadership post at … Read More

Strengthening mental health care in Malawi

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Nursing

From Seattle to Senegal, the importance of skilled mental health care is universal. But in some parts of the world – such as Malawi, where Seed partners to send Global Health Services Partnership (GHSP) Volunteers – availability of skilled mental health professionals is scarce. Amelia Rutter was working in a community and mental health integrated care clinic in Washington state when she found out about GHSP. Despite the thousands of miles that separated her from her eventual placement in Malawi, as a GHSP Nurse Educator, she was drawn to the opportunity to help teach the next generation of mental health educators in a resource-limited health system. And what she found was that the mental health issues facing even incredibly different communities are largely the same. “What is so interesting is yes, there are culturally different ways of addressing mental health … Read More

GHSP Nurse Educator Megan Coe: Two years of teaching and learning in Malawi

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Malawi, Uncategorized

Prior to becoming a Global Health Service Partnership Volunteer in 2014, Megan Coe did not have any experience as a nurse educator. So naturally, she learned a lot in her first year as a faculty member at Kamuzu College of Nursing (KCN) in Lilongwe, Malawi. And it was the lessons she learned that first year that inspired her to extend her service for a second. “That had been my first year teaching,” she explained. “I felt that staying a second year, doing another round of of classes, I could improve what I had learned in teaching and keep moving forward.” Now, she will continue to use the knowledge she has gained in the last two years to further her service for a third year. “The more you understand and learn about the context, the more you have to offer,” says … Read More