Family Nurse Practitioners: Essential to Eswatini’s Health

Julie Anathan, RN, MPHBlog, Nursing, Swaziland, Uncategorized

Nurses are the lifeblood of a thriving health system. In fact, the World Health Organization estimates that nearly half of the world’s entire health workforce are nurses and midwives. And in Eswatini (formerly Swaziland), nurses play a particularly important role in this nurse-driven national health system. To help meet this essential need, Seed Global Health has partnered with University of Eswatini (UNESWA) to strengthen nursing by building a versatile and relevant advancing nursing discipline in the country: the family nurse practitioner. The nurse practitioner role began in the United States in 1965 for registered nurses who obtained masters level education and clinical experience to prepare them to assess, diagnose, manage, and educate patients across the health spectrum. Family nurse practitioners (FNPs) not only deliver this breadth of primary, acute and specialty healthcare to patients of all ages and walks of … Read More

HRH Roundup: What We Are Reading, August 2018

Kerry OBrienArchives, Blog, News, Uncategorized

Where do you get your news in human resources for health? Here’s a roundup of what our team has been reading over the past month and what you might want to check out too! Get this and more news delivered to your inbox – click here to sign up for our bimonthly newsletter.. To End the HIV Epidemic, Focus on Sexual Violence Prevention (Council on Foreign Relations, July 17) The data show that girls make up almost three quarters of new infections among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa, with nearly 1,000 adolescent girls and young women infected with HIV every day. Report Warns Of ‘Dangerous Complacency’ In The Fight Against HIV (NPR, July 19) The report finds that efforts to prevent the spread of HIV have stalled, in part, because international funding for AIDS has begun to decline. I was diagnosed … Read More

Commitment to Care: Training Critical Care Nurses in Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Tanzania, Uncategorized

“We all belong to a large international community of critical care nurses” Tanzanian Critical Care Nurse In Tanzania, a country of more than 50 million people, there is a dual burden of high prevalence of infectious disease, such as HIV, and a growing prevalence of non-communicable disease. Additionally, there is a significant, and increasing, burden of critical illness. Strengthening critical care services, in both urban and rural areas, is a priority of the Ministry of Health. Nurses in Tanzania provide the majority of care in critical care units and require specialized skills to work within such a clinically complex environment. Progress in pre-service, masters and in-service training in critical care nursing has been made, but there remains a need to strengthen the clinical aspects of training, particularly in-service training, to care for such high acuity patient. Partnering with Massachusetts General … Read More

Creating a Lasting Impact

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Medicine, Uncategorized

Anneka Hooft had just finished residency as a pediatrician when she moved to Malawi to teach and train students at the College of Medicine (COM) in Blantyre. We recently spoke with Anneka to reflect on her year as a volunteer educator, what she passed on to her students, and what she learned from her time in Malawi. Why did you decide to apply for GHSP? I wanted to be a part of something that would have a lasting impact. There are so many opportunities to provide care in low resource settings, and I worked clinically abroad, but I wanted to be sure that my work could be part of something larger. I was drawn to the idea of working with students and training future providers in the local context of where they would work. What did your work entail during … Read More

Strengthening Nursing in Malawi

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Nursing, Uncategorized

Globally, nurses deliver the highest percentage of patient care. They are critical to strengthening health systems and responding to more acute crisis, like disease outbreaks. Despite being on the frontline of care, the global shortage of nurses continues to grow. Currently, it is estimated that 9 million more nurses and midwives are necessary to adequately meet health care needs. In Malawi, there is fewer than 1 nurse to care for every 1,000 people.  And such a significant shortage may be a contributing factor to poor health outcomes. To overcome this shortage, Seed Global Health has been placing volunteer nursing educators in Malawi since 2013. Since our inaugural year, 32 nurse educators have taught and trained future nurses and nursing educators at four nursing institutions. Working alongside local nursing professionals and educators, our volunteers strengthen in-country education. They teach courses, develop … Read More

Hope for Midwifery in Liberia

Karen Shulman, Senior Manager of Strategic PartnershipsBlog, Liberia, Midwifery, Uncategorized

Midwives are the heart of maternal and child health around the world. The support, care and advice they give during pregnancy, labor and the postpartum period is essential for the wellbeing of mothers, families, and communities. Seed Global Health is proud to teach and train midwives, and we’ve been doing so in Liberia since 2016. Dr. Nicole Geller, a nurse midwife, is in her second years of service as a visiting faculty member, helping to build the future of midwifery practice in Liberia.  She shared her thoughts with me on her work and her great hopes for midwifery in the country as she continues to help build the next generation of midwives and local leadership. -KS Midwifery in Liberia is making great progress.  There is more to do and it is exciting to see that, right now, there is a … Read More

Sharing knowledge to strengthen family medicine

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Medicine, Uncategorized

“Family doctors have always been the backbone of health care. Family doctors have always been the bedrock of comprehensive, compassionate, and people-centered care” -Dr. Margaret Chan, Director-General World Health Organization  Today, nearly 80 percent of the burden of non-communicable disease occur in low- and middle- income countries. To overcome this challenge, global health care has shifted toward prevention and primary care, focused on halting the rise of chronic disease. Family medicine, first recognized as a specialty in the United States more than 40 years ago, aims to address just that. Family medicine focuses on comprehensive care for patients of all ages and genders that integrates social determinants of health and serves as an advocate for patients. As Seed Global Health’s Director of Family Medicine, Dr. Esther Johnston, explains, “The strength of a family medicine doctor is that they are trained … Read More

Seeing the Future of Health in Tanzania

Clelia Anna Maninno, PhDBlog, Tanzania, Uncategorized

In early June I left Boston to join colleagues and Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) educators in Tanzania for the educators’ Close of Service meeting, where they wrap up their year of service. After twelve months of training and teaching, these visiting faculty members gathered to reflect on their experience, and enjoy a hard-earned celebration of their service to Tanzania’s future doctors and nurses. I spent the days leading up to the meeting engaging with GHSP educators inside and outside of the classroom, getting to know them and learning about their experiences. Attending the Tanzania Medical Trainee Research Conference – sponsored by Hubert Kairuki Memorial University (HKMU), the Hubert Kairuki Memorial University Student Association, the University of Dodoma, and the Global Health Service Partnership – I was able to see the product of a fruitful collaboration between a dynamic HKMU … Read More

Combatting HIV Stigma in Swaziland

Eileen Stuart-Shor, PhD, ANP-BC, FAHA, FAANBlog, Nursing, Swaziland, Uncategorized

Swaziland has the world’s highest estimated rate of HIV, with 28% of adults infected. The disease has had a devastating effect on the country, stunting the economy, overwhelming the health system, and exacerbating other challenges including poverty and gender inequality. Looking for ways to combat the disease, all students at the University of Swaziland are required to complete a course focused on HIV. This year, GHSP Nurse Educator Catherine Dell was assigned to teach this introductory course. Yet rather than teaching nursing students, as this seasoned educator has been accustomed to in her career, she was assigned a new challenge: to teach more than three hundred Agricultural Science students. “I was initially a little disappointed to not be teaching nursing students. Since it was a required course, I got the sense that the students weren’t at all interested in learning … Read More