APPLY TO BE A NURSE, MIDWIFE, OR PHYSICIAN EDUCATOR


Overview

Health professionals are the backbone of strong health systems and the key drivers to linking communities to care and achieving health for all. Through strong collaboration with the public sector, Seed Global Health (Seed) educates a rising generation of physicians, nurses, and midwives to help strengthen access to high-quality care. We believe that training effectively, building the workforce, and ensuring sustainability requires a long and deep investment; we are committed to such engagement.

Seed believes that people are the most important levers of change in the health system. At the same time, we recognize that for these changes to endure and sustain, we need to work at an individual and systems level to build skills, knowledge, and capacity. Our core strategy centers on placing skilled and qualified physician, nurse, and midwife educators in visiting faculty roles at partner institutions for a minimum of one academic year.

Seed Educators work with their local counterparts to help meet critical health education, practice, and policy priority needs identified by our partners. Together, they advance health professionals’ education and training in the classroom and clinical setting. Ultimately, they enhance health workers’ ability to deliver services effectively and sustainably where needed the most.


Positions


How to Apply

Applications for 2020-2021 Seed Educator positions have closed. Please check back on August 1, 2020 when applications open for the 2021-2022 academic year.

If you have questions about Seed, our program, or future physician, nurse, and midwife educator positions, please contact info@seedglobalhealth.org.


More Information 

Do you have any questions? Please read our FAQs or email info@seedglobalhealth.org 

Learn more about our work, visit our blog to read about our educators’ impact, and subscribe to our mailing list for regular updates.


GLOBAL HEALTH BY THE NUMBERS


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Sub-Saharan Africa accounts for almost 80% of the global total of new HIV infections.

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The World Health Organization estimates that there will be a critical shortage of 18 million doctors, nurses and midwives by 2030.

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There are no medical schools in 6 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.