Meet Lillian: Defying “Tradition” to Pursue her Medical Dreams

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Tanzania, Uncategorized

There are only 3 physicians for every 100,000 people in Tanzania. Even fewer of those providers are female, with some reports stating that only one-third of physicians in the country are women. But in one woman’s bold pursuit of a dream for a healthier world, tradition takes a backseat. Medical intern Lillian Alphonce Mbuni isn’t discouraged by the lack of female representation in her field: “Women make great physicians,” she says. “Women understand things differently than men. And they bring a different perspective that makes them great caregivers and health care providers.” Last year, Lillian spent her vacation volunteering at the Obstetrics and Gynecology clinic at Sengerema District Hospital alongside Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) Physician Educator Dr. Siobhan McCarty-Singleton. Together, they provided no-cost care to women who visited the clinic . “I learned so much from her,” says Lillian, … Read More

“Why did this mother die?”

Daisy WinnerBlog, Tanzania, Uncategorized

During Dr. Abel Mussa’s internship, he was one of eight doctors in a hospital department that saw about 400 patients a day. Dr. Mussa performed more than 200 C-sections during his training, and frequently noticed that mothers would often not survive the surgical procedure. After a number of tragic outcomes, he began to dig for answers. “Why did this mother die?” Dr. Mussa recalled asking himself, “I could not sleep – I was losing my courage  – it was very troubling…I discovered that during a C-section, the woman is under general anesthesia and there are a number of complications that they can encounter that would cause them to lose their life… I completely changed. I had to tell the head doctor, I want to finish this year and then I am going to back to school and I am going … Read More

Let’s Support Safe Anesthesia Practices

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

Anesthesia remains an often overlooked area of health care in low and middle income countries (LMICs), where there is a critical shortage of trained anesthesiologists. In Tanzania for example, there are only 22 medical doctor anesthesiologists for 47 million residents (source: http://thelancet.com). Without the ability for health systems to offer safe anesthesia to patients in need of surgery, surgically treatable conditions will continue to be a leading cause of death. Recognizing this critical shortage of trained anesthesiologists, Seed Global Health (Seed) would like to support education and training to increase capacity in this specialty in Tanzania. Eighty percent of the funds raised from this campaign will support four Masters in Medicine (MMed) Anesthesiology residents at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania over the next three academic years. The remaining funds will support various equipment … Read More

A Young Anesthesiologist is Making a Difference in Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

In Tanzania, a country with only 22 anesthesiologists for more than 49 million people, guaranteeing your time spent in the hospital will be pain free, can be hard to secure. As a young anesthesiologist, Lukasola “Luka”, is committed to providing his patients the care needed to control and manage their pain. Luka is one of the four Masters in Medicine (MMed) Anesthesiology residents at Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences (MUHAS) that Seed Global Health has committed to supporting over the next three academic years. For Luka, it was his experience in a district hospital that inspired him to pursue anesthesiology, “I was working as a medical practitioner at a district hospital. And we were having very poor patients who were not recovering well. And I discovered that one of the reasons why we were having very poor output … Read More

There Is Strength in Numbers – A letter to Tanzanian Mothers

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Tanzania

“There is Strength in Numbers”: A letter from GHSP Nurse Educator and Midwife, Tess Weidner, to the mothers of Tanzania.  Dear Tanzanian mothers, Mimi ninaitwa Tess. Mimi ni mkunga. Mimi ni hapa kukusaidia. My name is Tess. I am a midwife. I am here to help. I know that I have already learned more from you than I could ever give back. I may not speak fluent Swahili and I certainly do not have all the skills or resources to save every baby or to heal every woman, but I am here. I am by your side. I promise I will do my best to stay true to myself and stand by you in moments of happiness and sorrow. I will try to share my strength by holding your hand, offering a simple smile, or resting next to you in silence. … Read More

Incoming GHSP Volunteers Olivia and Jason: Couple’s passion for global health brings them to Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania, Uncategorized

Olivia had just finished working in Kenya and Jason had just returned from India when they met as juniors in college where she was studying nursing and he was preparing for medical school. Passion for global health drew the two together and next month they are headed to Tanzania as part of the fourth class of Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers. We recently spoke with them about their dedication to teaching and training and their expectations for their upcoming year of service.  What inspired each of you to follow your respective careers?  Olivia – I decided during college that I wanted to go into midwifery. I was learning about social injustices and inequality and I wanted to find a career to address that in a tangible way. I found I could do that through working in women’s health. I also had … Read More

Seed Award Improves Training for Students, Care for Patients in Tanzania

Andrew MarxBlog, Medicine, Seed Awards, Tanzania, Uncategorized

When Ruth Oenga and Sakina Moloo started the second semester of their fourth year in medical school in Tanzania back in March, they had a basic theoretical understanding of what electrocardiograms are used for and what the readouts look like. But they had never laid their hands on an EKG machine. Nor had they ever had an opportunity to observe and practice how EKGs can be used to improve diagnosis and treatment for a variety of different cardiac patients and conditions. Now, just three months later — thanks to the initiative of three of their faculty and a Program Support Award from Seed Global Health — Ruth, Sakina, and their classmates have all practiced using an EKG machine in their classes and applied their newly acquired skills and knowledge to help patients at the hospital. “We had been learning how to … Read More