Commitment to Care: Training Critical Care Nurses in Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Tanzania, Uncategorized

“We all belong to a large international community of critical care nurses” Tanzanian Critical Care Nurse In Tanzania, a country of more than 50 million people, there is a dual burden of high prevalence of infectious disease, such as HIV, and a growing prevalence of non-communicable disease. Additionally, there is a significant, and increasing, burden of critical illness. Strengthening critical care services, in both urban and rural areas, is a priority of the Ministry of Health. Nurses in Tanzania provide the majority of care in critical care units and require specialized skills to work within such a clinically complex environment. Progress in pre-service, masters and in-service training in critical care nursing has been made, but there remains a need to strengthen the clinical aspects of training, particularly in-service training, to care for such high acuity patient. Partnering with Massachusetts General … Read More

Ultrasound Equipment Assists Students with Hands-On Training

Jennifer CoulombeBlog, Malawi, Medicine, Tanzania, Uganda

There is a big difference between learning about a lifesaving medical procedure from a book verse being able to learn and practice the skill in real time to gain confidence and mastery. Seed Global Health has partnered with 27 teaching sites in five African countries to help translate theory into practice through classroom and clinical education, mentorship, and introducing new tools and skills. This has included equipping skills labs in midwifery, and introducing simulation-based education in partnership with U.S. academic institutions. Simulators, in particular, provide a much easier way to learn and teach ultrasound. Medical equipment and supplies give students practical, hands-on training, both through campus skills labs and on the hospital wards where they do rounds with faculty. However, the availability of medical simulation equipment to gain these skills can be inaccessible and costly in low-resource settings. Seed is partnering … Read More

Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Health Workforce

Mark Marino, MPH, Seed Global HealthBlog, Featured, Liberia, Medicine, Nursing, Tanzania

Tomorrow marks the start of this year’s Skoll World Forum, an event focused on social entrepreneurship, innovation, and solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. As in previous years, there promises to be robust conversation on increasing access to quality health services by leveraging the power of technology. With the supply of health workers in developing countries not meeting the demand, it is important to identify innovative technology that can help doctors, nurses, midwives, and community health workers provide effective and efficient patient care. With nearly two-thirds of the world’s population in possession of a cell phone, mobile health (mHealth) in particular has enormous potential to support health workers. Consider one way that mobile is being used to empower nurses. Research shows that often nurses feel unsupported in the workplace, and have to contend with outdated information, protocols, and limited … Read More

Championing Health Workers in the SDGs

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Liberia, Malawi, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda

The most recent report from the United Nations on the advancements made towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals finds that while progress has been made across all areas of development, the pace of progress has been slow, and advancements have been uneven to fully meet the implementation of the SDGs by 2030. Established in 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted by all member countries of the United Nations focused on ending poverty, protecting the planet, and ensuring prosperity for all as part of a new sustainable development agenda. Each goal has specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years. SDG 3 seeks to ensure health and well-being for all, at every stage of life. Major strides have been made in improving health around the world: between 2000 and 2015, the global maternal mortality ratio declined by 37 per … Read More

International Youth Day 2017

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

International Youth Day appreciates the unique contributions of young people in building inclusive, sustainable peace throughout society. The young medical and nursing students around the world who are training to become our future health care providers and leaders are essential in improving health, a prerequisite for long term stability and peace. This summer, Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, with support from Seed Global Health and the Global Health Service Partnership, hosted the first Medical Trainee Research Conference. Over two days more that 350 undergraduate and post graduate students from around Tanzania came together to present research and learn from one another. The conference proved to be an inspiration to students, galvanizing the importance of collaboration and participation as they go on to become leaders in their communities. George Msengi, a third-year medical student, was the chair of the student organizing committee … Read More

Dr. Warles Charles Lwabukuna – Transforming the future of Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

Dr. Warles Charles Lwabukuna’s dedication to the health of people in his home country, Tanzania, is clear. Currently working as an Assistant Lecturer at Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dr. Lwabukuna is simultaneously earning his Mmed degree in Internal Medicine. And for the last three years, he has worked alongside Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) Volunteer Educators at HKMU to help train and empower even more health professionals for Tanzania’s future. Together, they are training the next generation of physicians and improving care for patients across the country. We recently spoke with Dr. Lwabukuna about his experience as both a clinician and educator working in Tanzania, as well as his experience with GHSP Volunteers. Tell us about yourself. Where are you from? I am from Western Tanzania and but I completed my training as physician here at Hubert Kairuki. After leaving … Read More

Seeing the Future of Health in Tanzania

Clelia Anna Maninno, PhDBlog, Tanzania, Uncategorized

In early June I left Boston to join colleagues and Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) educators in Tanzania for the educators’ Close of Service meeting, where they wrap up their year of service. After twelve months of training and teaching, these visiting faculty members gathered to reflect on their experience, and enjoy a hard-earned celebration of their service to Tanzania’s future doctors and nurses. I spent the days leading up to the meeting engaging with GHSP educators inside and outside of the classroom, getting to know them and learning about their experiences. Attending the Tanzania Medical Trainee Research Conference – sponsored by Hubert Kairuki Memorial University (HKMU), the Hubert Kairuki Memorial University Student Association, the University of Dodoma, and the Global Health Service Partnership – I was able to see the product of a fruitful collaboration between a dynamic HKMU … Read More

Little Changes, Big Difference

Zack LangwayBlog, Midwifery, Tanzania

For Wreatha Carner, it’s the little things that she knows can make the biggest difference. A Certified Nurse Midwife based out of Las Cruces, New Mexico, Wreatha has spent this year serving as a Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) Volunteer teaching, training, and working alongside midwives in Tanzania. “As a clinical instructor, some of my 4 or 5 person student groups perform as many as 15 births between them in 8 hours,” said Wreatha, describing the busy conditions under which midwives work. In a country facing a dire shortage of midwives and other skilled health professionals, only 4 midwives are in service for every 10,000 patients across Tanzania. So in addition to training and teaching the next generation of Tanzanian midwives – helping to build capacity, strengthen the pipeline of skilled midwives in Tanzania, and ultimately “train the trainers” for … Read More

Nurses Speaking Up, Speaking Out in Tanzania

Zack LangwayBlog, Nursing, Tanzania

As part of our National Nurses’ Week series on nursing and the Sustainable Development Goals, GHSP Volunteer Olivia Kroening-Roche, CNM, interviewed Pauline Mella, a colleague at our partner institution Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, on her life’s work and how nurses can leverage their voices for action in Tanzania. === “Why I am so proud is I was able to go through that challenge. Oh, rubbish, some people said,” she explained to me as I sat across from her. “Seriously,” I exclaimed my naïveté and incredulity on display at my disbelief that anyone could oppose a degree program for nurses. “Yes,” she responded calmly, an incredible woman who has led her field with competence and confidence to the place it is today. She continued to recount to me how her initial attempts to create a bachelors program in nursing were met with resistance … Read More

Celebrating Midwives: A Tale of Two Lindas

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Malawi, Nursing, Tanzania

As we celebrate International Day of the Midwife, we reflect on the critical contributions of our Volunteer midwives to helping build the next generation of midwifery. Since 2013, Seed has placed fifteen midwives who have trained close to 2,000 individuals. These midwife educators are providing essential training to the next generation, who will in turn provide care for countless numbers of mothers and their babies. Linda Jacobsen, Seed Global Health Deputy Chief Nursing Officer and Director of Midwifery Programs, has worked in reproductive health and public health for more than thirty years. She was part of the inaugural class of Global Health Service Partnership Volunteers and taught at Bugando Medical Center in Mwanza in 2013. Linda Robinson is currently serving a Nurse Educator in Malawi and has been practicing as a nurse-midwife for thirty years, working from rural Maine to … Read More