Mentoring, Training, and Empowerment to Help Babies Breathe

Kiran Mitha, MDBlog, Nursing

Helping Babies Breathe (HBB), the resuscitation program focused on saving babies in the first minutes of life, has drawn attention to newborn survival in resource-limited settings. Midwives, traditional birth attendants, nurses, physicians, and students have all learned how to give newborns their best chance at taking life’s first breath through the HBB curriculum. In pilot studies of HBB, the knowledge health workers gain through HBB has dramatically reduced newborn mortality – and since almost a million newborns don’t make it through their first day of life, the impact of these skills cannot be underemphasized. Yet there are still many providers who have not been trained in the life-saving techniques of HBB, or who do not feel confident implementing their knowledge into practice.  Education and training are core to our work at Seed Global Health, and the central component of the … Read More

Combatting HIV Stigma in Swaziland

Eileen Stuart-Shor, PhD, ANP-BC, FAHA, FAANBlog, Nursing, Swaziland, Uncategorized

Swaziland has the world’s highest estimated rate of HIV, with 28% of adults infected. The disease has had a devastating effect on the country, stunting the economy, overwhelming the health system, and exacerbating other challenges including poverty and gender inequality. Looking for ways to combat the disease, all students at the University of Swaziland are required to complete a course focused on HIV. This year, GHSP Nurse Educator Catherine Dell was assigned to teach this introductory course. Yet rather than teaching nursing students, as this seasoned educator has been accustomed to in her career, she was assigned a new challenge: to teach more than three hundred Agricultural Science students. “I was initially a little disappointed to not be teaching nursing students. Since it was a required course, I got the sense that the students weren’t at all interested in learning … Read More

Science to Practice to Policy: International AIDS Society Conference 2017

Brittney van de Water, PhD, RN, CPNPBlog, Malawi, Nursing

The science of improving health underpins the professional community’s ability to provide adequate care for those facing HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and many other infectious diseases. And every two years, the International AIDS Society (IAS) convenes a scientific conference to share and discuss research and findings within HIV/AIDS and other disease areas. In fact, the IAS meeting is the largest open science conference on HIV/AIDS-related issues for a variety of researchers and clinicians. The focus of the conference is to move science into practice and policy – and as a newly minted PhD, I am excited to be attending the upcoming meeting in Paris, France to present part of my doctoral dissertation as an oral presentation. My dissertation, which I completed at Duke University School of Nursing, focused on age-appropriate treatment for individuals with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in South Africa. Specifically, I … Read More

Nurse Educator returns to Uganda to expand her impact

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Uganda

Just twenty miles from the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in Arua, Uganda, is Muni University – the only university in Uganda’s West Nile Region. Muni opened just last year, with the help of Global Health Service Partnership Nurse Educators, including Genevieve Evenhouse. Working with the nursing faculty, Genevieve and her fellow volunteers helped secure accreditation for the institution and develop the curriculum for the nursing program. Because of its remote location, attracting faculty to the new school has been difficult. Genevieve ended her year of service in July of 2016 and returned to her work as a school district nurse with the San Francisco Unified School District, yet knowing the difficulties with finding enough teachers, felt an urge to return to Muni. “I knew that Muni was going to have little teaching support and they were … Read More

Reflections on two years of teaching in Uganda

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Uganda

Robert Kasibante has deep ties to the country where he has served for the last two years a Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) nurse educator. Robert was born in Uganda, the country where his parents still live and where two of his three children were born. He grew up in the United States, earning his bachelor’s degree in Nursing in Texas before working in Washington for the last several years. But his return to Uganda has been a significant time in his life. We recently spoke with Robert about his time as a GHSP Nurse Educator, and what he has both taught and learned during two years in Uganda. Why did you want to become a nurse? My grandmother and three of my aunts were nurses. They were the ones who inspired me. I really fell in love with nursing … Read More

Our Communities Depend on Nurses

Eileen Stuart-Shor and James MuchiraBlog, Nursing

For the final post in our National Nurses’ Week series on nursing and the Sustainable Development Goals, Seed Global Health Chief Nursing Officer Eileen Stuart-Shor and UMass Boston PhD student James Muchira, RN, BSN respond to the following prompt: “The wealth of our nations depends on the health of our populations, and the health of our populations depends on nursing.” How does nursing lift up entire communities, in addition to the essential health care nurses provide? In Kenya and across sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), the prevalence of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is rapidly rising. The emerging threat of NCDs defies a commonly-held belief that African countries are dominated by infectious diseases, malnutrition and maternal and child deaths: today, hypertension and diabetes are the leading cause of death in the Africa, with 10 to 20 million people estimated to have hypertension and 10 million people estimated … Read More

Nursing, the Work of Humanity

Aazamina SudBlog, Nursing

As part of our National Nurses’ Week series on nursing and the Sustainable Development Goals, Seed Global Health Program Manager Aazamina Sud reflects on today’s prompt: “I venture to contend that the work of nursing is one of humanity all the world over.” How can we better support fellow nurses in delivering the best care possible in any setting? As the global disease burden increasingly becomes more and more complex, nurses continue to deliver care at the front lines, day in and day out, all over the world. How can we better support them in delivering the best care possible? While nurses often make up the majority of the health workforce in many countries, they are also affected the most by critical shortages. At Seed Global Health, we build pre-service education capacity in our partner countries so that nurses new to the … Read More

Humanizing Care: How Nurses Put People First

Zack LangwayBlog, Malawi, Nursing

As part of our National Nurses’ Week series on nursing and the Sustainable Development Goals, Malawian nurse educator and Coordinator for Academic Affairs for SJOGCHS, our colleague and friend Isaac Ziba, reflected on “humanized health care” and the role of nurses in centering the human experience for a patient’s best care, with a foreword by Seed Global Health’s Julie Anathan. Foreword: The ability to provide humanized and patient centered care can be challenging within environments where human resources for health are limited. In the US we have over 9 nurses per 1000 people while in Malawi there are less than one per 1000 people. In areas of the world where there are dire shortages of nurses, the day to day responsibilities for nursing staff can be stressful and overwhelming. In these settings, how do nurses stay focused on providing holistic care?  St. … Read More

Nurses Speaking Up, Speaking Out in Tanzania

Zack LangwayBlog, Nursing, Tanzania

As part of our National Nurses’ Week series on nursing and the Sustainable Development Goals, GHSP Volunteer Olivia Kroening-Roche, CNM, interviewed Pauline Mella, a colleague at our partner institution Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, on her life’s work and how nurses can leverage their voices for action in Tanzania. === “Why I am so proud is I was able to go through that challenge. Oh, rubbish, some people said,” she explained to me as I sat across from her. “Seriously,” I exclaimed my naïveté and incredulity on display at my disbelief that anyone could oppose a degree program for nurses. “Yes,” she responded calmly, an incredible woman who has led her field with competence and confidence to the place it is today. She continued to recount to me how her initial attempts to create a bachelors program in nursing were met with resistance … Read More

National Nurses’ Week: Voices of Nurses

Zack LangwayBlog, Nursing

This week, we celebration National Nurses’ Week! Each day, we will publish a short blog related to this year’s ICN theme of nursing and the SDGs. Today, we asked for responses to this prompt: “Get to the table and be a player, or someone who doesn’t understand nursing will do that for you.” How can nurses use their voices to help advance sustainable health and development? Linda Jacobsen, our Deputy Chief Nursing Officer, weighs in on today’s question: “Nurses must see policy as something they can shape rather than something that happens to them,” according to the landmark Institute of Medicine report, The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health.  This is especially relevant in limited resource settings, where the majority of providers are nurses and midwives.  Our ability to improve outcomes in patient care and community health is strengthened by being at the table, and … Read More