International Youth Day 2017

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

International Youth Day appreciates the unique contributions of young people in building inclusive, sustainable peace throughout society. The young medical and nursing students around the world who are training to become our future health care providers and leaders are essential in improving health, a prerequisite for long term stability and peace. This summer, Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, with support from Seed Global Health and the Global Health Service Partnership, hosted the first Medical Trainee Research Conference. Over two days more that 350 undergraduate and post graduate students from around Tanzania came together to present research and learn from one another. The conference proved to be an inspiration to students, galvanizing the importance of collaboration and participation as they go on to become leaders in their communities. George Msengi, a third-year medical student, was the chair of the student organizing committee … Read More

Dr. Anthony Ocaya: Four years with the Global Health Service Partnership

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Uganda

Dr. Anthony Ocaya is the Deputy Dean of Gulu University in Uganda, where he coordinates student education programs, and a partner to the Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) since its inception. When GHSP Volunteer Educators arrive to Gulu, Anthony is the one who pairs them to departments, introduces them to the hospital staff, and helps assimilate them into the teaching and learning atmosphere. He’s their constant, interacting with Volunteers every day – and he’s done this since the very first Volunteer arrived as part of our inaugural cohort in 2013. We recently spoke to Dr. Ocaya about his experience with GHSP, and what he has learned during these past four years. What are some of the biggest challenges facing medical education in Uganda? Dr. Anthony Ocaya (AO): Human resources. The main thing now is that we do not see a … Read More

Dr. Warles Charles Lwabukuna – Transforming the future of Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

Dr. Warles Charles Lwabukuna’s dedication to the health of people in his home country, Tanzania, is clear. Currently working as an Assistant Lecturer at Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dr. Lwabukuna is simultaneously earning his Mmed degree in Internal Medicine. And for the last three years, he has worked alongside Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) Volunteer Educators at HKMU to help train and empower even more health professionals for Tanzania’s future. Together, they are training the next generation of physicians and improving care for patients across the country. We recently spoke with Dr. Lwabukuna about his experience as both a clinician and educator working in Tanzania, as well as his experience with GHSP Volunteers. Tell us about yourself. Where are you from? I am from Western Tanzania and but I completed my training as physician here at Hubert Kairuki. After leaving … Read More

Passion, Purpose, and Practice: My Journey to Health Justice

Fola May, MD, PhDBlog, Featured, Medicine

Dr. Fola May is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at UCLA, a staff physician in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare Network (VA), Assistant Director for the UCLA STAR program, Co-Director of the UCLA Global Health Education Program, and Director of Internal Medicine Programs for Seed Global Health. The field of public health is equally important to the practice of medicine itself. I learned this important lesson in the early 2000s, when I was an undergraduate student at Yale, during a six-month service project in Nicoya, a tiny town in the Guanacaste Peninsula of Costa Rica. As the daughter of a doctor, I’ve been immersed in medicine for virtually all of my life, and growing up, I frequently joined my father on medical mission trips to West Africa. My father was raised in rural Nigeria and immigrated to the United States to … Read More

Resilience in the Face of Despair

Daisy WinnerBlog, Liberia, Medicine

Each year between 50,000 to 100,000 women worldwide are affected by obstetric fistula, a hole in the birth canal caused by prolonged labor without adequate medical intervention. Women who suffer from an obstetric fistula are left with chronic incontinence, and often, a stillborn baby. The constant leaking of urine or feces means women face humiliation and stigmatization, as they become isolated by family members, friends, and communities. It is estimated that more than 2 million young women live with untreated obstetric fistula in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. If left untreated, fistula can lead to chronic medical problems and even death, but surgery can normally repair the injury. Physician Educator, Dr. Corrine (Cori) Maund has been teaching in Liberia for the last year. Cori had never encountered a case of obstetric fistula until last September, just a few weeks after arriving … Read More

The Challenge and Heartbreak of Low-Resource Surgical Care

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Uganda, Uncategorized

Bob Goodman, an orthopedic surgeon, served from 2014 to 2015 as a Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) volunteer educator in Uganda. Bob reflects on the difficulty and heartbreak of trying to provide the best surgical care possible in a setting where resources are unavailable for timely, safe and effective surgery. A 23 year old young woman, Angela, presented to the orthopedic clinic with a swollen left thigh and an ulcerating lesion of the bone below her knee. Her symptoms had begun many months before, and multiple tiny laceration scars on her leg were evidence of the unsuccessful treatment she had received from a traditional healer. Angela was admitted to the orthopedic service at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital. The x-rays showed destruction in her tibia and a calcified tumor on her left femur. Cultures of her wound grew Staphylococcus. The available … Read More

Safe Surgery: Essential for Wellbeing

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Medicine, Uncategorized

Surgically-treatable conditions kill close to 17 million people each year, and worldwide, five billion people do not currently have access to safe surgical care and anesthesia. In low- and middle-income countries, 9 out of 10 people cannot access even the most basic surgical services. Dr. Bela Denes, a general surgeon who has been teaching in Malawi for the last year, is dedicated to closing the gap in safe surgery and saving lives. As a Seed Global Health Volunteer, Bela has been teaching young medical students at the University of Malawi, College of Medicine, equipping them with the essential skills to perform lifesaving surgeries, even with limited resources. We asked Bela to reflect on his time as a surgeon and educator in Malawi and share his thoughts on improving access to safe surgery. What are the biggest challenges facing safe surgery … Read More

Quality OB/GYN Care for All

Dr. Maureen Ries, Seed Global HealthBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

Obstetricians and gynecologists play an undeniably important role in women’s health and wellbeing, particularly during pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. But both at home and around the world, there is a troubling and growing gap between the need and availability of skilled obstetric professionals. Ahead of this week’s American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) annual meeting, Seed Global Health’s Director of Obstetrics and Gynecology Programs, Dr. Maureen Ries, reflects on the importance and future of global OB/GYN workforce strengthening. === Caring for women impacts the health of not only one woman, but her baby, her children at home and her family as a whole. Access to, and provision of, good maternal health care reduces maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality.  A healthier mother raises healthier children.  Health is also intertwined in women’s empowerment and gender equality.  All of … Read More

Abraham: How I Make a Difference as a Health Worker

Zack LangwayBlog, Medicine, Uganda

“I think that one of the best ways that I can make a difference as a health worker, is tackle problems at the upstream level.” This is what drives the passion and professional ambition of Abraham Openy, a fifth-year medical student at Gulu Univeristy in Uganda. And his dreams of having an impact go beyond treating individual patients. “I have always wanted to make a different in my community, since I was young. And its why I decided to pursue medicine. But I want to have a greater impact by working at a policy level. I want to apply my passion for social justice and equity to health care.” Abraham’s drive is evident when examining his growth as a leader in his community and school. He is currently part of the Federation of the Uganda Medical Students Association (FUMSA), a … Read More

#WHWWeek: Investing in Skilled Health Workers

Dr. Vanessa KerryBlog, Medicine, News, Nursing, Sharing Strengthening Saving

By Dr. Vanessa Kerry, CEO, Seed Global Health Here’s to World Health Worker Week! You might not be familiar with this important holiday, but you should be. There is a crisis in the global health workforce. Right now, there is a gap of more than 8 million health workers globally. And if we do nothing, we will face a shortage of 18 million health workers by 2030. That’s 18 million people who will not be delivering babies, giving vaccinations, treating diseases like Zika, nor conducting surgeries. They simply will not exist in the health workforce. While many efforts have done incredible work to improve health – training community health workers, increasing access to medications and building new facilities – there has been less focus on the skilled doctors, nurses and midwives who are needed to support those frontline and community … Read More