HRH Roundup: What We’re Reading, May 2018

Kerry OBrienBlog, Featured, News

Where do you get your news in human resources for health? Here’s a roundup of what our team has been reading over the past month and what you might want to check out too! Get this and more news delivered to your inbox – click here to sign up for our bimonthly newsletter. New research partnership makes childbirth safer in Mozambique The Conversation, March 26 As the world awakens to deep injustices for women globally, an ambitious project led by University of Saskatchewan researchers in Mozambique is striving to reset the course —reducing maternal mortality and improving newborn health by empowering women and girls. Midwives leading the way with quality care FIGO, April 5 Quality of care is a priority for reducing preventable maternal and child deaths. It is also the theme for this year’s International Day of the Midwife; ‘Midwives leading … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 4

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

In early 2017, Seed’s Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning team surveyed alumni of GHSP’s first three cohorts to learn more about the motivations and factors that led them to serve, their challenges and support after completing service, their current work, and the impact of their GHSP experience. In total, we received responses from the 88 alumni that completed service in years 1-3, representing an 86% response rate. Selected findings are highlighted below.   58% of alumni indicated working often or always in underserved populations and/or in resource-limited settings domestically upon completion of their service.   Challenges faced upon return: The most frequently-mentioned challenge that alumni faced upon their return was their readjustment to life and work in the United States (42%). For example, alumni reported challenges in resuming work with an excess of resources, reverse culture shock, feeling disconnected to their … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 3

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

Core to Seed’s Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning (MEL) practices is regularly synthesizing the data that we collect into a global picture of our programmatic impact.  We recently engaged in this internal reflection exercise, examining three data sources in particular: a qualitative evaluation of GHSP in its first two years of implementation; a 2017 survey of over 1600 students who have worked with GHSP Volunteers over the years; and a 2017 learning exercise that evaluated GHSP’s outcomes on the student learning experience.  Findings coalesced into three core areas of impact: Delivering quality education in both the classroom and clinical setting Improving students’ confidence, increasing their knowledge, improving their clinical skills, and improving their ability to translate what they learn in the classroom setting to their clinical practice. Promoting students’ professional growth & development Improving students’ confidence, fostering pride in their profession, … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 2

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

The WHO projects that 40 million new health sector jobs will be created by 2030, concentrated in middle- and high-income countries, yet low- and middle- income countries are projected to face a shortage of 18 million health workers by this time Despite these bleak statistics, the thousands of medical and nursing students, are a reason to remain optimistic. Since 2013, Seed’s flagship program, the Global Health Service Partnership, has helped train more than 13,700 students in Liberia, Malawi, eSwatini (formerly known as Swaziland), Tanzania, and Uganda. This partnership brings highly-qualified U.S. healthcare volunteers to educate local medical and nursing students over the course of a year through instruction in the classroom and at the bedside. By teaching local health professionals, entire communities and countries can benefit from the “ripple effect” created when students become more-skilled clinicians and are then better … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 1

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” — Benjamin Franklin Closing the health workforce gap, so that local leaders and local professionals can meet local need, is not a short-term commitment. But improvements in the long-term necessitate reflection and data-based adjustments in strategy and implementation. Any effort to create lasting change must not only celebrate “progress” framed broadly, but also effectively measure improvement, evaluate impact, and learn – from both success and failure – so as to continuously improve upon its approach. And we take our commitment to continuous learning and improvement within our work seriously. Since 2013, Seed Global Health has partnered with the US Peace Corps and the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to deploy volunteer nurses and physicians to teach and train medical and nursing students as part of a unique collaboration – the … Read More

HRH Roundup: What We’re Reading, April 2018

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured, News

Where do you get your news in human resources for health? Here’s a roundup of what our team has been reading over the past month, and what you might want to check out, too! Get this and more delivered to your inbox – click here to sign up for our bimonthly newsletter. Female health workers in conservative Afghanistan facing immense barriers Xinhua, April 8 Scarcity of female health workers still remains a challenge in conservative Afghanistan despite improvement in women’s status and progress in the health sector within the last 17 years. Everyone needs access to quality health services – WHO Malawi24, April 7 As the world celebrates the World Health Day today, World Health Organization (WHO) has stressed the need for everyone to access health services. According to a statement released by WHO, universal health coverage for everyone, everywhere … Read More

Technology, Innovation and Entrepreneurship in the Health Workforce

Mark Marino, MPH, Seed Global HealthBlog, Featured, Liberia, Medicine, Nursing, Tanzania

Tomorrow marks the start of this year’s Skoll World Forum, an event focused on social entrepreneurship, innovation, and solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. As in previous years, there promises to be robust conversation on increasing access to quality health services by leveraging the power of technology. With the supply of health workers in developing countries not meeting the demand, it is important to identify innovative technology that can help doctors, nurses, midwives, and community health workers provide effective and efficient patient care. With nearly two-thirds of the world’s population in possession of a cell phone, mobile health (mHealth) in particular has enormous potential to support health workers. Consider one way that mobile is being used to empower nurses. Research shows that often nurses feel unsupported in the workplace, and have to contend with outdated information, protocols, and limited … Read More

VOA Health Chat: Long-Term Investments in the Workforce

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured, News

Earlier this week, Seed Global Health CEO Dr. Vanessa Kerry joined health reporter Linord Moudou on Voice of America’s “Health Chat.” At Seed Global Health, we believe that investing in strong, locally-led health workforces is both an imperative and a long-term proposition. As Dr. Kerry noted in her interview, “to solve the really big problems… like a health care shortage — either on the sub-Saharan African continent, elsewhere in the world, or in your home in the U.S — it’s about looking long-term and making the right investments now that pay dividends in the future.” Listen to the full interview above to hear Dr. Kerry’s insights into the need for investment, the challenges of the current U.S. global health funding landscape, and the opportunities to harness novel approaches and youth passion for a healthier tomorrow.

Health Workers: Living at the Intersection of Health, Climate, and Global Security

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured

The first week in April once again brings our annual commemoration of World Health Worker Week: a time to celebrate the work that health workers do and to acknowledge both the challenges they face and the evolving ecosystem they operate in. We know that health workers of all varieties play a critical role in supporting health service delivery, ensuring that individuals and families’ needs are met. But this World Health Worker Week, it’s important to focus on the role of health workers in strengthening global security and creating a safer world – and how necessary that role is as we look toward the future. When you think of global security what are the some of the first things that come to mind? You might think of war, military strength, and the power of diplomacy. However, one of the best investments … Read More

Celebrating Doctors Like Gail!

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured, Malawi, Medicine

National Doctors’ Day is March 30th. Each year, this day gives us an opportunity to thank, celebrate, and reflect on the incredible physicians who have played a role in each of our lives. And at Seed Global Health, physicians play a huge part in our work, serving as volunteer medical educators in order to help teach and train the next generation of providers and educators. This year, we shine the spotlight on one of our amazing OB/GYN volunteers, Gail Yanowitch. Gail served as a volunteer OB/GYN educator from 2016 to 2017 teaching and training alongside local counterparts at the University of Malawi College of Medicine in Mangochi, Malawi. After completing her service, Gail then went back to Mangochi in early 2018. In a returning role, Gail continued the work she began the year before, both training fourth-year Malawian medical students … Read More