HRH Roundup: What We’re Reading, May 2018

Kerry OBrienBlog, Featured, News

Where do you get your news in human resources for health? Here’s a roundup of what our team has been reading over the past month and what you might want to check out too! Get this and more news delivered to your inbox – click here to sign up for our bimonthly newsletter. New research partnership makes childbirth safer in Mozambique The Conversation, March 26 As the world awakens to deep injustices for women globally, an ambitious project led by University of Saskatchewan researchers in Mozambique is striving to reset the course —reducing maternal mortality and improving newborn health by empowering women and girls. Midwives leading the way with quality care FIGO, April 5 Quality of care is a priority for reducing preventable maternal and child deaths. It is also the theme for this year’s International Day of the Midwife; ‘Midwives leading … Read More

Commitment to Care: Training Critical Care Nurses in Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Tanzania, Uncategorized

“We all belong to a large international community of critical care nurses” Tanzanian Critical Care Nurse In Tanzania, a country of more than 50 million people, there is a dual burden of high prevalence of infectious disease, such as HIV, and a growing prevalence of non-communicable disease. Additionally, there is a significant, and increasing, burden of critical illness. Strengthening critical care services, in both urban and rural areas, is a priority of the Ministry of Health. Nurses in Tanzania provide the majority of care in critical care units and require specialized skills to work within such a clinically complex environment. Progress in pre-service, masters and in-service training in critical care nursing has been made, but there remains a need to strengthen the clinical aspects of training, particularly in-service training, to care for such high acuity patient. Partnering with Massachusetts General … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 4

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

In early 2017, Seed’s Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning team surveyed alumni of GHSP’s first three cohorts to learn more about the motivations and factors that led them to serve, their challenges and support after completing service, their current work, and the impact of their GHSP experience. In total, we received responses from the 88 alumni that completed service in years 1-3, representing an 86% response rate. Selected findings are highlighted below.   58% of alumni indicated working often or always in underserved populations and/or in resource-limited settings domestically upon completion of their service.   Challenges faced upon return: The most frequently-mentioned challenge that alumni faced upon their return was their readjustment to life and work in the United States (42%). For example, alumni reported challenges in resuming work with an excess of resources, reverse culture shock, feeling disconnected to their … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 3

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

Core to Seed’s Monitoring, Evaluation & Learning (MEL) practices is regularly synthesizing the data that we collect into a global picture of our programmatic impact.  We recently engaged in this internal reflection exercise, examining three data sources in particular: a qualitative evaluation of GHSP in its first two years of implementation; a 2017 survey of over 1600 students who have worked with GHSP Volunteers over the years; and a 2017 learning exercise that evaluated GHSP’s outcomes on the student learning experience.  Findings coalesced into three core areas of impact: Delivering quality education in both the classroom and clinical setting Improving students’ confidence, increasing their knowledge, improving their clinical skills, and improving their ability to translate what they learn in the classroom setting to their clinical practice. Promoting students’ professional growth & development Improving students’ confidence, fostering pride in their profession, … Read More

Ultrasound Equipment Assists Students with Hands-On Training

Jennifer CoulombeBlog, Malawi, Medicine, Tanzania, Uganda

There is a big difference between learning about a lifesaving medical procedure from a book verse being able to learn and practice the skill in real time to gain confidence and mastery. Seed Global Health has partnered with 27 teaching sites in five African countries to help translate theory into practice through classroom and clinical education, mentorship, and introducing new tools and skills. This has included equipping skills labs in midwifery, and introducing simulation-based education in partnership with U.S. academic institutions. Simulators, in particular, provide a much easier way to learn and teach ultrasound. Medical equipment and supplies give students practical, hands-on training, both through campus skills labs and on the hospital wards where they do rounds with faculty. However, the availability of medical simulation equipment to gain these skills can be inaccessible and costly in low-resource settings. Seed is partnering … Read More

Midwives: “A Force for the Better”

Diana Garde, CNM, ARNP​Blog, Midwifery, Nursing, Uganda

People ask “why midwifery?” and “what drew you to this field?” and I often feel that my attempt to answer falls very short of explaining how it is that I ended up in Northern Uganda, teaching midwifery to eager, bright baccalaureate-level students. How does one adequately explain why we crave some thing, feel at peace in some special place or why we fall in love? How do you express the gut feeling that something is ‘right’? How do you explain the draw towards something that at once needs to be absorbed and simultaneously diffused outward in the world? My choice in career has been not so much a calculated decision, but rather an organic movement. Each day around the world, there are 360,000 heroic women who experience childbirth. Approximately 830 of those women die in the process. Not all are … Read More

Midwives: Drivers and Leaders in Addressing MNCH Gaps

Robyn Churchill, Senior Midwifery Advisor, Seed Global HealthBlog, Midwifery, Nursing

Midwives have existed even before formalized healthcare. We were the original healers, birth attendants, and confidantes. The role of the midwife has been improved upon and integrated into the healthcare sector, but historically, midwives have come from their communities, and in nearly every society on the planet, women go to midwives to birth their babies. I was teaching in Newark, NJ and on my way to graduate studies in education when I had a transformational experience with midwives. Just having had a baby with midwives in a birth center, I was supporting two of my students, providing advice to them as they navigated their ways through sub-par healthcare during their own pregnancies. I thought back to the quality and compassionate care I received from my midwives, and said to myself, “in another life, I would be a midwife.”’ It’s a … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 2

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

The WHO projects that 40 million new health sector jobs will be created by 2030, concentrated in middle- and high-income countries, yet low- and middle- income countries are projected to face a shortage of 18 million health workers by this time Despite these bleak statistics, the thousands of medical and nursing students, are a reason to remain optimistic. Since 2013, Seed’s flagship program, the Global Health Service Partnership, has helped train more than 13,700 students in Liberia, Malawi, eSwatini (formerly known as Swaziland), Tanzania, and Uganda. This partnership brings highly-qualified U.S. healthcare volunteers to educate local medical and nursing students over the course of a year through instruction in the classroom and at the bedside. By teaching local health professionals, entire communities and countries can benefit from the “ripple effect” created when students become more-skilled clinicians and are then better … Read More

Family Medicine is Key to Beating Malaria

Mark MarinoBlog, Malawi, Medicine

Today marks World Malaria Day, a day to highlight efforts to reduce malaria and to focus on the need for continued investment and commitment for prevention and control. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), “the global response to malaria is at a crossroads. After an unprecedented period of success in malaria control, progress has stalled.” At Seed, we understand that doctors, nurses, midwives and other health workers are critical to keeping curable diseases like malaria under control. Health professionals are on the front lines in communities combatting the spread of this disease. It takes a village to make progress and implement change—from individuals to corporations—all of us must come together to put an end to malaria. Funding and research is needed, and thanks to a partnership with the ExxonMobil Foundation, Seed Global Health has been able to strengthen and build … Read More

Turning Learning Into Impact: Part 1

Clelia Anna ManninoBlog, Featured

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” — Benjamin Franklin Closing the health workforce gap, so that local leaders and local professionals can meet local need, is not a short-term commitment. But improvements in the long-term necessitate reflection and data-based adjustments in strategy and implementation. Any effort to create lasting change must not only celebrate “progress” framed broadly, but also effectively measure improvement, evaluate impact, and learn – from both success and failure – so as to continuously improve upon its approach. And we take our commitment to continuous learning and improvement within our work seriously. Since 2013, Seed Global Health has partnered with the US Peace Corps and the Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) to deploy volunteer nurses and physicians to teach and train medical and nursing students as part of a unique collaboration – the … Read More