Celebrating Doctors Like Gail!

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured, Malawi, Medicine

National Doctors’ Day is March 30th. Each year, this day gives us an opportunity to thank, celebrate, and reflect on the incredible physicians who have played a role in each of our lives. And at Seed Global Health, physicians play a huge part in our work, serving as volunteer medical educators in order to help teach and train the next generation of providers and educators. This year, we shine the spotlight on one of our amazing OB/GYN volunteers, Gail Yanowitch. Gail served as a volunteer OB/GYN educator from 2016 to 2017 teaching and training alongside local counterparts at the University of Malawi College of Medicine in Mangochi, Malawi. After completing her service, Gail then went back to Mangochi in early 2018. In a returning role, Gail continued the work she began the year before, both training fourth-year Malawian medical students … Read More

Leading for a TB-Free World

Zack LangwayBlog, Featured, Nursing, Swaziland

Tuberculosis (TB) remains a devastating disease that disproportionately affects developing countries: today, over 95% of TB deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. World TB Day is commemorated each year on March 24th to raise awareness around the devastating consequences of tuberculosis (TB). Access to health is a fundamental human right – skilled health professionals are the leaders who can help prevent, treat, and end TB around the world. Nurses, midwives, doctors and health providers on the ground, in developing countries have a clear view of how TB affects their communities. The Kingdom of Swaziland has the world’s highest incidence rate of TB, with 80% of TB cases co-infected with HIV. We interviewed Volunteer Educator Yohannes Wondimagegnehu, RN, BSN, MPH who teaches community health nursing at the University of Swaziland as a guest lecturer through the Global Health Service Partnership … Read More

Partnering for Quality Education & Quality Care

Zack LangwayBlog, Medicine, Nursing

Every country should have a strong health workforce so that all people can access the care they need to live healthy and productive lives. And at the backbone of a strong health workforce are doctors, nurses and midwives who are trained, confident, and ready ensure that everyone, no matter where they live, has equal access to high quality care. Seed Global Health believes that excellence in education is the cornerstone of health professionals’ success. And we strive to support this vision, partnering with U.S. academic institutions allow us to deepen the quality and sustainability of the training and teaching we support in five African countries. “By pairing healthcare volunteers from universities and medical and nursing schools across the United States with local health professionals in countries like Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda, we create a ripple effect of shared knowledge,” explains … Read More

Resources Beyond the Classroom

Daisy WinnerBlog

From core clinical skills to more advanced practices, Seed Global Health volunteer educators strengthen in-country health professional education, in nursing and medicine, to help the next generation of health providers meet local needs. Often, this goes beyond lecturing students in a classroom or instructing trainees in the clinic. Providing the most comprehensive training often requires materials, supplies, and learning opportunities commonly unavailable at our partner institutions. But thanks to Seed Global Health’s unique Program Support Resources Initiative (PSRI), volunteer educators can receive support to give their students and colleagues the education needed to produced highly skilled clinicians. Since 2013, PSRI has awarded volunteer educators and their in-country colleagues small grants to purchase equipment, host learning opportunities or training workshops, and obtain clinical supplies. These awards aim to support an educational goal identified by our partner academic institutions. In 5 years, … Read More

Women of Action: The “Force” in the Global Health Workforce

Dr. Vanessa Kerry, CEO, Seed Global HealthBlog, Featured

She is a nurse. She is midwife. She is a surgeon. She is essential to the healthcare care we receive. The role women play in the health workforce globally – and here at home – cannot be overstated. Their action, their passion and their dedication to their practice often can be the difference between life and death for millions of people around the world every day. They are a force of their own, working sometimes in the extraordinarily difficult conditions: crisis areas, resource-depleted clinics, and cultures where they are asked to save lives but giving little respect. And women in the health workforce typically earn less than their male counterparts — and in some cases, they earn little or nothing at all. The statistics are well-known and often-cited. More than 70 percent of the global health workforce are women.  Women’s … Read More

Nursing Now!

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Midwifery, Nursing, Uganda

As the majority of front line health workforce, nurses around the world are essential to meeting the health care needs of our communities. Yet the dire shortage of nurses globally poses a major challenge for high and low income countries alike:  sub-Saharan Africa alone faces a shortfall of more than 600,000 nurses. Yesterday, the World Health Organization and the International Council of Nurses launched the Nursing Now campaign, which aims to raise the status of nursing and empower nurses around the world. The three-year campaign will work with partners around the world to advocate for nurses, supporting their ability to be properly trained, increasing their role in policy making, and enabling them to tackle today’s and tomorrow’s health challenges. Uganda, where Seed Global Health has been supporting nursing education since 2013, was chosen to pilot the Nursing Now Africa initiative. … Read More

Midwives Matter for Liberia

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Liberia, Midwifery

In Liberia, 44 percent of women give birth at home without a skilled birth attendant. Without the support of a trained professional, women die every day from preventable causes related to pregnancy and child birth. Midwives are essential partners in stopping these unnecessary deaths, as they play an instrumental role in ensuring skilled care for mom and baby during pregnancy, childbirth, and in the important first days and weeks after birth. Seed Global Health has supported midwifery in Liberia since 2015, placing volunteer midwifery educators at partner institutions to work alongside local educators in teaching and training the next generation of midwives in the country. We pair skilled, volunteer faculty – like Nicole Geller, who has spent the last two years empowering midwifery students through clinical education –  with local midwives, teaching and working together so that mothers throughout communities … Read More

Championing Health Workers in the SDGs

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Liberia, Malawi, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda

The most recent report from the United Nations on the advancements made towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals finds that while progress has been made across all areas of development, the pace of progress has been slow, and advancements have been uneven to fully meet the implementation of the SDGs by 2030. Established in 2015, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were adopted by all member countries of the United Nations focused on ending poverty, protecting the planet, and ensuring prosperity for all as part of a new sustainable development agenda. Each goal has specific targets to be achieved over the next 15 years. SDG 3 seeks to ensure health and well-being for all, at every stage of life. Major strides have been made in improving health around the world: between 2000 and 2015, the global maternal mortality ratio declined by 37 per … Read More

Creating a Lasting Impact

Daisy WinnerBlog, Malawi, Medicine, Uncategorized

Anneka Hooft had just finished residency as a pediatrician when she moved to Malawi to teach and train students at the College of Medicine (COM) in Blantyre. We recently spoke with Anneka to reflect on her year as a volunteer educator, what she passed on to her students, and what she learned from her time in Malawi. Why did you decide to apply for GHSP? I wanted to be a part of something that would have a lasting impact. There are so many opportunities to provide care in low resource settings, and I worked clinically abroad, but I wanted to be sure that my work could be part of something larger. I was drawn to the idea of working with students and training future providers in the local context of where they would work. What did your work entail during … Read More

Caught in the Crossfire: Health Systems in Conflict Areas

Daisy WinnerBlog, Featured, Medicine, Midwifery, Nursing

 The conflicts in Syria, Yemen, and Afghanistan are unlike any wars seen before. Long-running and complex, these conflicts have devastated these countries – untold numbers of citizens have been killed and even more have been forced to flee their homes for neighboring states. There are more than five million registered Syrian refugees alone. As violence and fighting wages on, infrastructure and public services have collapsed. Health systems in these countries have been torn apart. Overwhelmed, understaffed, structurally damaged, and under-resourced, health centers have been brought to the brink of collapse. As of October 2017, resulting from the ongoing conflict, health facilities in Yemen had not received funding to cover operational costs in thirteen months and almost 30,000 health workers had not received their salaries consistently during this period. Yet they ask to save lives in dire conditions every day. CSIS … Read More