International Youth Day 2017

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

International Youth Day appreciates the unique contributions of young people in building inclusive, sustainable peace throughout society. The young medical and nursing students around the world who are training to become our future health care providers and leaders are essential in improving health, a prerequisite for long term stability and peace. This summer, Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, with support from Seed Global Health and the Global Health Service Partnership, hosted the first Medical Trainee Research Conference. Over two days more that 350 undergraduate and post graduate students from around Tanzania came together to present research and learn from one another. The conference proved to be an inspiration to students, galvanizing the importance of collaboration and participation as they go on to become leaders in their communities. George Msengi, a third-year medical student, was the chair of the student organizing committee … Read More

Dr. Anthony Ocaya: Four years with the Global Health Service Partnership

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Uganda

Dr. Anthony Ocaya is the Deputy Dean of Gulu University in Uganda, where he coordinates student education programs, and a partner to the Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) since its inception. When GHSP Volunteer Educators arrive to Gulu, Anthony is the one who pairs them to departments, introduces them to the hospital staff, and helps assimilate them into the teaching and learning atmosphere. He’s their constant, interacting with Volunteers every day – and he’s done this since the very first Volunteer arrived as part of our inaugural cohort in 2013. We recently spoke to Dr. Ocaya about his experience with GHSP, and what he has learned during these past four years. What are some of the biggest challenges facing medical education in Uganda? Dr. Anthony Ocaya (AO): Human resources. The main thing now is that we do not see a … Read More

Dr. Warles Charles Lwabukuna – Transforming the future of Tanzania

Daisy WinnerBlog, Medicine, Tanzania

Dr. Warles Charles Lwabukuna’s dedication to the health of people in his home country, Tanzania, is clear. Currently working as an Assistant Lecturer at Hubert Kairuki Memorial University, Dr. Lwabukuna is simultaneously earning his Mmed degree in Internal Medicine. And for the last three years, he has worked alongside Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) Volunteer Educators at HKMU to help train and empower even more health professionals for Tanzania’s future. Together, they are training the next generation of physicians and improving care for patients across the country. We recently spoke with Dr. Lwabukuna about his experience as both a clinician and educator working in Tanzania, as well as his experience with GHSP Volunteers. Tell us about yourself. Where are you from? I am from Western Tanzania and but I completed my training as physician here at Hubert Kairuki. After leaving … Read More

Seeing the Future of Health in Tanzania

Clelia Anna Maninno, PhDBlog, Tanzania, Uncategorized

In early June I left Boston to join colleagues and Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) educators in Tanzania for the educators’ Close of Service meeting, where they wrap up their year of service. After twelve months of training and teaching, these visiting faculty members gathered to reflect on their experience, and enjoy a hard-earned celebration of their service to Tanzania’s future doctors and nurses. I spent the days leading up to the meeting engaging with GHSP educators inside and outside of the classroom, getting to know them and learning about their experiences. Attending the Tanzania Medical Trainee Research Conference – sponsored by Hubert Kairuki Memorial University (HKMU), the Hubert Kairuki Memorial University Student Association, the University of Dodoma, and the Global Health Service Partnership – I was able to see the product of a fruitful collaboration between a dynamic HKMU … Read More

Combatting HIV Stigma in Swaziland

Eileen Stuart-Shor, PhD, ANP-BC, FAHA, FAANBlog, Nursing, Swaziland, Uncategorized

Swaziland has the world’s highest estimated rate of HIV, with 28% of adults infected. The disease has had a devastating effect on the country, stunting the economy, overwhelming the health system, and exacerbating other challenges including poverty and gender inequality. Looking for ways to combat the disease, all students at the University of Swaziland are required to complete a course focused on HIV. This year, GHSP Nurse Educator Catherine Dell was assigned to teach this introductory course. Yet rather than teaching nursing students, as this seasoned educator has been accustomed to in her career, she was assigned a new challenge: to teach more than three hundred Agricultural Science students. “I was initially a little disappointed to not be teaching nursing students. Since it was a required course, I got the sense that the students weren’t at all interested in learning … Read More

Passion, Purpose, and Practice: My Journey to Health Justice

Fola May, MD, PhDBlog, Featured, Medicine

Dr. Fola May is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at UCLA, a staff physician in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare Network (VA), Assistant Director for the UCLA STAR program, Co-Director of the UCLA Global Health Education Program, and Director of Internal Medicine Programs for Seed Global Health. The field of public health is equally important to the practice of medicine itself. I learned this important lesson in the early 2000s, when I was an undergraduate student at Yale, during a six-month service project in Nicoya, a tiny town in the Guanacaste Peninsula of Costa Rica. As the daughter of a doctor, I’ve been immersed in medicine for virtually all of my life, and growing up, I frequently joined my father on medical mission trips to West Africa. My father was raised in rural Nigeria and immigrated to the United States to … Read More

Science to Practice to Policy: International AIDS Society Conference 2017

Brittney van de Water, PhD, RN, CPNPBlog, Malawi, Nursing

The science of improving health underpins the professional community’s ability to provide adequate care for those facing HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and many other infectious diseases. And every two years, the International AIDS Society (IAS) convenes a scientific conference to share and discuss research and findings within HIV/AIDS and other disease areas. In fact, the IAS meeting is the largest open science conference on HIV/AIDS-related issues for a variety of researchers and clinicians. The focus of the conference is to move science into practice and policy – and as a newly minted PhD, I am excited to be attending the upcoming meeting in Paris, France to present part of my doctoral dissertation as an oral presentation. My dissertation, which I completed at Duke University School of Nursing, focused on age-appropriate treatment for individuals with drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) in South Africa. Specifically, I … Read More

Nurse Educator returns to Uganda to expand her impact

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Uganda

Just twenty miles from the border of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, in Arua, Uganda, is Muni University – the only university in Uganda’s West Nile Region. Muni opened just last year, with the help of Global Health Service Partnership Nurse Educators, including Genevieve Evenhouse. Working with the nursing faculty, Genevieve and her fellow volunteers helped secure accreditation for the institution and develop the curriculum for the nursing program. Because of its remote location, attracting faculty to the new school has been difficult. Genevieve ended her year of service in July of 2016 and returned to her work as a school district nurse with the San Francisco Unified School District, yet knowing the difficulties with finding enough teachers, felt an urge to return to Muni. “I knew that Muni was going to have little teaching support and they were … Read More

Reflections on two years of teaching in Uganda

Daisy WinnerBlog, Nursing, Uganda

Robert Kasibante has deep ties to the country where he has served for the last two years a Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP) nurse educator. Robert was born in Uganda, the country where his parents still live and where two of his three children were born. He grew up in the United States, earning his bachelor’s degree in Nursing in Texas before working in Washington for the last several years. But his return to Uganda has been a significant time in his life. We recently spoke with Robert about his time as a GHSP Nurse Educator, and what he has both taught and learned during two years in Uganda. Why did you want to become a nurse? My grandmother and three of my aunts were nurses. They were the ones who inspired me. I really fell in love with nursing … Read More

Health for All: Human Right, Moral Imperative

Dr. Vanessa Kerry, CEO, Seed Global HealthBlog

We are failing some of the world’s most vulnerable people. From Syria, to South Sudan, to Myanmar, to Colombia, our global community faces an unprecedented crisis of displacement. Often leaving their homes with next to nothing – including their medical history or documentation – refugees quickly find themselves with little to no access to quality health care, compounding one of the worst human rights crises we’ve ever known. Declarations for a right to health appear throughout our recent history. Seventy years ago, with the founding charter of the World Health Organization (WHO), health was defined as “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity… and that the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health is one of the fundamental rights of every human being without distinction of race, religion, … Read More